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What's Got MDC Buzzing?

What's Got MDC Buzzing?

  • In the “truth hurts” category, Richard Longworth of The Midwestern minces no words about the decline of American cities and towns. It is a familiar list of foreclosure, poor health, and disappearing industry. Longworth acknowledges that real prosperity still exists in some world-class cities, but they are “outposts, not locomotives…they don’t pull an entire economy behind them.” Time to put on your thinking caps, friends: where’s the economic engine that will restore prosperity?
  • One Tennessee farmer, featured in the New York Times, has found a short-term solution to Longworth’s decline: “Over the course of a month, Stan Vaught’s two sons will make more money letting people walk through a maze carved from 10 acres of corn than he will raising cattle and soybeans on the other 190 acres of his family’s farmland.”
  • In 2008, Forbes declared Asheboro, NC, to be one of American’s fastest dying towns; a new CBS News special explores how they’re fighting that categorization, and are now “somewhere between recovery and recession.” There are some great web extras, too, about North Carolina’s changing economy and Miss Jenny’s pickles.
  • NPR came to North Carolina this week, too. Robert Siegel interviewed several North Carolinans, exploring these questions: Why do some achieve wealth, while others struggle? Why does one woman make it to the executive suite, while another man drives a taxi? And what do we think explains our prosperity — or lack thereof? The responses reveal that there are probably as many answers to that questions as there are people, but that safety nets and supports—from family, from the community, from the government—almost always figure in.
  • Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity highlighted four new documentaries that are telling the story of poverty in America. While not all of these films have release plans, we’re hopeful that they’ll make their way to screens large and small, spurring conversations and action in communities across our country.:
  • Poor Kids will air on PBS’s Frontline this month. Check your local listings!
  • A Place at the Table will document hunger insecurity in our country and how limited access to healthy food affects families and our economy
  • The Raising of America: Early Childhood and the Future of Our Nation looks at links between early childhood experiences and opportunities in adulthood.
  • American Winter profiles eight families and how they’re making it through the Great Recession.
  • And we’ll end with the “truth in satire” category, The Onion names something that’s been missing from most all of the electioneering, and it’s no laughing matter.