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When Disaster Strikes - Promising Practices - Migrant Workers

Migrant worker communities are at greater risk from disasters than other populations. For example, the Midwestern United States experienced catastrophic flooding in 1993 and left thousands of migrant workers stranded, unable to return to their homes in Texas. Following hurricane Wilma in October of 2005, the Florida harvest was destroyed, and an estimated 71,350 farmworkers suddenly were out of work.

The circumstances in which migrant workers live create numerous challenges for disaster preparedness and response such as geographic isolation, language and cultural barriers, residential and employment transience, substandard housing, limited vehicular mobility, low income, and sometimes uncertain immigration status.